ACA protections for sick patients still popular despite gop’s efforts to end them

by Jordan Rau

Even as many Republicans continue to back a repeal of the Affordable Care Act, a majority of GOP voters want to retain a core consumer protection of the law that prohibits insurers from denying care or charging more to people with histories of health problems, according to a poll released Wednesday, June 27.

The requirement that insurers treat people with preexisting conditions the same as those with pristine health histories allowed the law to expand coverage to millions of previously uninsurable people starting in 2014.

But the Trump administration has refused to defend it in a legal challenge against the law brought by 20 Republican state attorneys general. The administration called for the protections guaranteeing coverage to be nullified.

The poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation showed 7 in 10 people think insurance companies should not be permitted to deny coverage because of a person’s medical history or charge them higher rates. Support for the preexisting conditions provision included 58 percent of Republicans.

As the 2018 congressional elections near, Democratic and independent voters identify health care as “the most important issue” for candidates to discuss. Support for the provision is especially strong among households where someone has a preexisting condition. But it remains a second-tier priority for Republican voters, according to the poll, nearly tied with immigration and behind the economy and jobs. Nearly 6 in 10 Republican voters place a priority on a candidate’s support for repealing the health law.

There is more partisan agreement on President Donald Trump’s proposal to require that drugmakers publish list prices for their drugs in television commercials. Three-fourths of the public support the idea.

Those drug ads are ubiquitous on TV, and 14 percent of people who said they saw an ad said they had talked with a doctor about the specific medicine, the poll found. More than half said the physician gave them the drug and 48 percent said they discussed the cost of the medicine with the doctor.

The poll was conducted June 11-20 among 1,492 adults. The margin of error is +/-3 percentage points for the full sample.

This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. 

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Kaiser Health News
Kaiser Health News

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a nonprofit news service committed to in-depth coverage of health care policy and politics. And we report on how the health care system — hospitals, doctors, nurses, insurers, governments, consumers — works.

1 Comment
  1. My hopefully last comment to Gel- I expected you would as a journalist share a more responsible fact-based report to substantiate your initial claim against our POTUS that could have caused the shooting in Maryland! Your audience deserve to be informed not swayed by political bias! As a popular journalist such as what you hold, you should be above mere controversial emotional hearsay reports. Especially, it is rare that a Filipina could hold this level of attention such as yours, that we have a much higher expectations from you on every article you put out there. You are in a great vantage point to affect, educate, inform & make a difference in Filipinos’ lives all over the world, instead of using your platform to just be a mouthpiece to one side of the political aisle & the liberal msmedia! I had my own battles from my own humble beginnings till I now enjoy this God-given success in my own career. So, my way of giving back is to be out there to correct misconceptions about the state of this nation from the grassroots level. to battle each day in making sure America is going in the right direction that God has pointed to us, for the sake of the future of all Americans especially our FilAm children & grandchildren!

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